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I have been wanting to dive into baking my own bread for ages.  I have a breadmaker and did that for awhile but I didn’t like how the loaves were shaped and the little paddle baked into the bottom of the loaf and when you pulled it out you had this huge hole in the bottom of your loaf.  So those of you that know me, know that I’m a wee bit of a procrastinator, just sometimes though.  So I’ve been saying for quite a while now that I was going to make my own bread and NOT use the bread maker.  I bought some loaf pans….about 2 years ago I think.  *blush*  Okay!  So I’m a big procrastinator!  So a Facebook friend of mine started posting pics of bread and cinnamon rolls that she had baked.  Apparently she had started a baking blog.  I went over and started perusing and BAM!  The clouds parted, angels sang, light shone down from Heaven…INSPIRATION!!!  So thank you Jen from http://grahamlikethecracker.net/

Honey Whole Wheat Bread by Williams Sonoma Essentials of Baking

5 teaspoons (2 packages) active dry yeast
2 cups milk, heated to warm (105-115F)
1/4 cup mild honey
2 large eggs
6 cups whole wheat flour, plus extra for kneading and topping
2 teaspoons salt
6 tablespoons unsalted butter, plus more for greasing the pans, at room temp

In a large bowl (or in the bowl of your mixer, if using), stir together the yeast and milk and let sit about 5 minutes, or until foamy.  Whisk in the honey and eggs, then add the flour, salt, and butter.

With mixer: Attach the bowl to your mixer and using the dough hook, knead on low speed.  Add a little flour as needed to prevent the dough from sticking to the bowl.  Allow to knead until the dough is smooth and elastic, which should take about 5-7.

Form the dough into a ball and place in a lightly oiled bowl, rolling around so the dough is coated.

Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and let the dough rise for about 1 1/2 – 2 hours in a warm, draft-free place.  It should double in size.

Butter two 9″x5″ loaf pans.

Press the air out of the dough, then turn it out again on a clean surface.  Using a sharp knife, cut the dough in half.  One at a time, flatten each half evenly into a rectangle using your palms.  Roll the bottom third up and press the seam with your hands to seal it.  Continue rolling up and sealing the dough until a log is formed.  Pinch the ends and seam to seal them.

Place each loaf seam side down into a pan and gently, evenly press on the tops.

Cover the loaves loosely with a towel or plastic wrap and let them rise again for 45 – 60 minutes.  They should double in size.

Towards the end, preheat the oven to 375F with the rack in the center.

Lightly dust the tops of the loaves with flour.  Bake for about 35 – 40 minutes or until honey brown.  You can test for doneness by tapping on the top; the loaves should sound hollow.  Remove the loves from the pans and let cool completely on wire racks.

This bread makes some AMAZING toast!  I’ve been carbing it up pretty good this week but I just can’t help myself.  And the kids just love it, even being a 100% whole wheat bread.  It’s extremely soft and light but with a nice and crusty outside.  This was a very easy recipe to follow and was very easy to do.  I think this could easily be a weekend bread to make for the family to use during the week.  I’d definitely give it 3 stars and an easy on the difficulty scale.

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Comments on: "Honey Whole Wheat Bread" (2)

  1. I wanted to make this recipe, but we don’t do dairy…. I wonder how it would go with Almond milk. Well done. 🙂

  2. Shelly’s boss is vegan and she swaps out alternatives in baking recipes all the time. You should try it!

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